Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CSPAN 6
CSPAN2 4
LINKTV 3
KCSM (PBS) 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
sees a cut in spending. >> street battles in tunisia following the funeral of the slain opposition leader chokri belaid. >> millions are in asia heading home to celebrate the year of the snake. for the first time in the history of the european union, the long-term budget will be cut. 27 eu leaders meeting in brussels have agreed to a final budget during a second summit arranged especially to do so. we will go live to brussels for the latest in just a moment. >> that's right -- the drastically reduced seven-year budget is worth 959 billion euros and was hammered out after two days of nearly round-the- clock negotiations and is far less than the just over $1 trillion euros -- and the one trillion euros the commission had originally proposed. >> german chancellor angela merkel went into the talks saying she was confident the agreement would be reached. in the end, the 27 member states came up with a compromise that even british prime minister david cameron welcomed as a good deal for britain >> it is perhaps nobody's perfect budget, but there is a lot in it for everybody. obviously, y
been a strong critic of tunisia's government. witnesses say that he died in a clinic after being attacked when he left home. this shows the place reportedly where he was shot. his family and the prime minister have called it an assassination. the leader of the party which dominates the government says it undermines the ability of tunisia. >> this is a heinous political climate seemed to undermine the stability of the country. targeting our transition to democracy and any development projects currently planned by the government. we consider the perpetrators as enemies of the country, of democracy, and of islam. >> a member of the opposition blame the government for the killing. >> i accuse that party. it has plotted for this assassination. we cannot be intrigued by their condemnation of the assassination. this is a defining day in our history and we hold the government responsible. >> let's get more on this from yusef, a journalist based in the tahitian capital, joining us over the telephone. good to have you with us. if what can you tell us about this killing? >> we know that sho
in the next half hour -- them of political unrest in tunisia after a leading secular politician is assassinated in front of his home. >> the german education minister is stripped of her document for playing it -- her doctorate for plagiarism, and the opposition calls for her resignation. >> the political crisis in tunisian deepened dramatically tonight following the assassination of a top opposition leader and the violent unrest that has followed in the wake of his killing. troops have been deployed in a number of locations to restore order. >> the killing of the prominent secular politician has sparked protests across the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist
week one of the men who helped bring rule to an end in tunisia was assassinated and france continues operations against al-qaeda and extremists in nearby mali. in egypt, there's growing opposition to president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in syria the civil war continues and it's gotten more complex in the wake of israeli air strikes to keep damascus from shifting weapons to nearby lebanon. here to help explain recrenate vents is jon alterman the director of the mideast program at the center for strategic and international studies. sir, thank you for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> so let's start. in north africa we have recent events in tunisia and we have the french operations in mali which least initially appear successful and scattering the al-qaeda elements and separating them from the tuareg and insurgents. how's the united states need to deal with this in a broad way? does it need to be getting involved in both mali and more broadly in the region? what do we need to be doing? >> if you're talking about intervention mali it's a question of what you're tryin
the dozens of abandoned airplanes at the country's airport. >> the ruling party of tunisia has projected its own prime minister's decision to dissolve the government. there is a homecoming of shokri belaid's remains. they predict the dissolution of parliament announced by its own prime minister. the assassination has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scan
>> more protester underway in tunisia -- protests are underway in tunisia. the other stories on al jazeera, as french forces in mali push north towards algeria, violence erupts in the capital. >> i am in brussels. after talks lasting through the night, we now have a draft proposal for the eu budget. many more hours ahead before a deal is finally done. >> nasa's curiosity rover gets down to work on the red planet. thousands of tunisians are gathering in their capital for the from -- funeral of a prominent opposition leader. shape -- shokri belaid was shot in front of his home. he was one of the government's fiercest critics. some are putting the blame on the ruling party. hashemi behar a -- hashem able horror -- haitian -- hashem ahelbarra is live with more. >> there are protests across the country and symbolic ceremonies paying tribute to the opposition leader. we are expecting the funeral to start anytime soon. the procession will be in the capital where he will be laid to rest. people are concerned about potential clashes with supporters of the government and supporters of the op
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
education and cheap housing. a senior opposition leader was killed in tunisia on his way to work. of the unified democratic patriot party, he was shot in the head and neck. he was a popular secularist. the tunisian prime minister described the killing as a terrorist act and a blow to>> ts the country's revolution. the cia has been operating a secret air base for unmanned drones in saudi arabia for the past two years. the u.s. media knew of its existence and did not report about it until now. it was set up to hunt for al qaeda yet -- al qaeda members in yemen. a powerful offshore earthquake caused a tsunami in the solomon islands. waves hit the remote villages closest to the epicenter. a footballer has found himself at the center of a racism rao, just days after joining an italian club. a video emerged showing the club's vice president making an offensive remark about the player at an event on sunday. there hasn't yet been no reaction. sometimes we all feel the need to get a bit of rest at work, particularly if you have been busy or had a rough night. what do you do? slump at your
. america finding itself on the sidelines. we are on the sidelines in egypt, tunisia, libya. we cannot pick who is going to be the winner. we can be there with help, with aid, should be there more. we could help with education and the things that america does best. to try and trick the metal is as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top, -- middle east as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top will be a disservice of america. we will not get the people we want on top. that is what we are seeing today. people that have not been close to america. they will find a way to build it that her society for themselves. america cannot choose george washington for somebody else. the syrians will have to find their own george washington. that will come out of this maelstrom of national revolution. they will find their leader that will lead them towards a better future and hopefully a democratic future. >> five sentences. >> i am not sure how to conclude. for the last 20 years, we have been not succeeding in warmaking or peacemaking in this region. the frame of reference is that --
and he was also country direct for more rocco and tunisia and earlier in the career did quite a bit of work we'll see brought occupant out in northern mali including the missions and trips among the foray in the region. we're delighted to have him on our team at the africa center as well as as a friend. we're delighted to have another old friend ricardo rene laremont professor of political science and sociology at begin -- he's been a wood friend and colleague and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i might mention that we are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. but delighted to have him. and also a friend and our wives have become friends as well. in the family, so to speak. and finally, last but not least, dr. anouar bokhars is the professor of political science at mcdaniel college and senior fellow at the middle east program at the carnegieen endowment and author quite a number of works. some fresh end in the their timing al qaeda and slam and -- and the effect. so you the biographical notes for their detail. i would note one thing not in the note
but it is an important one. in tunisia as you follow mentioned the support of the regime and need to go away but they need to be reconstituted in such a way that they serve a democratic state. we need to engage that question if we determine that that is in our interests. we have a failed state. it isn't the subject of a grand policy debate in the country because it seems too far away. but don't pay attention to the problem long enough and see what happens. it will be much less costly for us now to invest in a modest way to reconstitute the bases -- yellowing paper ongoing system to get intimate questions with poverty iain dhaka, and then of course the call continuing in this are a we have to then think about nigeria, northern nigeria. of the are to drive and for today's juan him to drive is another. there's only four days of traveling and its very, very important for us analysts to stop thinking from the national perspective s and start thinking from the regional perspectives. that is the only way that we are going to comprehend the dynamics appear of the challenges that are in front of us a
diplomatic staff in advance of a crisis, from central america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt and mali to and eyes. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i said, we had received from the intelligence community, almost 300 reports on upon threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities. including those in cairo, egypt. but there are no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m., eastern daylight time, on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 1 -- 17 minutes of the initial report, africom directed an unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to repos
, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the benghazi facility. it was focused on the primar
of change in north africa and the middle east, some of those countries, such as egypt, libya and tunisia, are more susceptible to extremism and radicalisation. were these countries discussed and was any action proposed? >> i thank my honorable friend for his support. as i said earlier, there was a discussion specifically about mali, but there is more to be done to support democracy and the building blocks of democracy in countries such as egypt and libya. the eu, with its partnership and neighbourhood funds, has a role to play there. >> has my right honorable friend received an apology from the shadow chancellor, who, as we were reminded, said in the chamber last october that the government had failed to build the alliances needed to deliver a real-terms eu budget cut? >> i am not sure the shadow chancellor really does apologies, but it has been great to be cheered to the echo by him during today's statement. i will not expect it every time, but it has been a pleasure. >> as a business owner, when negotiating with suppliers i was always able to drive down costs when there was a clear alt
or withdraw diplomatic staff in the advance of a crisis, from central america, from car whom, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. my -- by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance
, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions fear for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. hot so you can respond to them tuesday. i want to thank you and your family for being here. and i wish you well. thank you, and the hearing is adjourned. >> taking madam chairman. -- thank you madam chairman. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> now live coverage as we go to the state department with the new secretary of state john kerry will speak and hold a join
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)